a-year-in-champaign

Samuel Goldwyn Serving ‘A Year in Champagne’ in 2015

Samuel Goldwyn Films has bought North American rights to David Kennard’s documentary “A Year in Champagne” with plans for an early spring release.

Kennard’s follow-up to “A Year in Burgundy” screened at the Santa Barbara and Palm Beach International Film Festivals.

The film features behind-the-scenes footage at six Champagne houses, including Saint-Chamant, Gosset and Bollinger.

“Champagne is a beverage that people immediately associate with luxury and celebration and the film pays tribute to the region and people who make this very special wine,” said said Peter Goldwyn. “David takes the viewer on an incredible journey and delivers a vibrant, inside look at the complex world of champagne production.”

The deal was negotiated by Ian Puente and executive producer Todd Ruppert.

Goldwyn’s current titles include Freida Mock’s documentary “Anita,” William H. Macy’s feature directorial debut “Rudderless” and “The Last of Robin Hood.”

Hard decision to make

3 Tricks to Remedy a Wine Headache

I used to get a wine headache it seemed with every glass of red wine. As much as I prayed it was a fluke and that I wouldn’t fall victim to the infamous Red Wine Headache (RWH), with every drink, after about an hour, my head would start throbbing. Does this sound like you or someone you know who refuses delicious wine in order to save themselves a headache? Well, as it turns out there are several things that could cure you. There are also a very small number of people who are incurable and life will suck for them for reasons other than just wine.

I’m hoping you found this article in the stack of articles on red wine headaches, because chances are there are only 3 things you need to do to fix your problem.

3 Tricks to Remedy a Wine Headache

#1 Drink a Glass of Water With Every Glass of Wine.

The most common mistake that wine drinkers make is hydration. It’s easy to forget because you are drinking already. When there’s wine involved hydration is key and water is what you need. Make it a habit to chug a glass of water prior to enjoying a glass of wine. It may stress your waiter out but your forehead will appreciate you.

#2 Take “Two” Asprin Before Drinking.

By “two” I mean two aspirin, ibuprofen or acetaminophen. This is not recommended if you drink heavily, however if you’re like me and just want to enjoy a glass of wine without the ensuing headache, it’s reasonable to de-crud your blood with some over-the-counter blood thinners. The pills are also a great way to force yourself to drink a glass of water. Since I’m suggesting over-the-counter-drugs and I’m not your doctor, be sure to consult your doctor first. If you are uncomfortable with this idea, skip to trick #3 and repeat trick #1.

#3 Don’t Eat Sugary Things with Wine.

The only thing worse than a red wine headache is a cake-and-wine headache. Confetti cake sounds particularly amazing (especially after a glass of wine), however the combination of sugar and alcohol will greatly exacerbate the potential for a headache. If you are sensitive to wine, reserve confetti cake for your midnight coffee-and-cake binges only and stave off the dessert desire while drinking wine.

When I started drinking wine I got a lot of headaches. As it turns out, my wine choices (of cheapo grocery store wine) may have contributed to the reaction. Poorly made wines tend to have more adulteration such as residual sugar, sulfur, fining agents or higher alcohol to make them taste better. If it comes from a box or has a critter on the label then it’s suspect for headache potential.
“If it comes from a box or has a critter on the label then it’s suspect for headache potential.”

MYTH: Sulfites in Wine Cause Headaches

Back in the 1980s the food and drug administration discovered that about 1% of the population was allergic to sulfites. Because of the health concern for the sensitive population, wines above 20 ppm (parts per million) must be labeled with “contains sulfites”. Sulfites are found naturally on grapes and sulfur is also commonly added in small amounts at the beginning of fermentation and prior to bottling. Typically red wines have about 50-350 ppm and white wines have more, about 250-450 ppm (because of extreme sensitivity to light, heat and discoloration). The general litmus test for sulfites sensitivity is dried fruit. Mangos and apricots contain about 4-10 times as many (1000-3000 ppm) sulfites.

FACT: Histamines Cause Inflammation

Dr. Freitag from the Diamond Headache Clinic in Chicago originally wrote an article about how histamines may be the culprit in causing red wine headaches(1). Foods that have been fermented or aged have higher levels of histamines such as tofu, tempeh, champagne, red wine, ketchup and aged meats. Histamines can cause inflammatory flushing and wakefulness at night. Since most histamines are a cause of allergic reactions (similar to hay-fever), taking an anti-histamine prior to drinking may solve the problem. An ancient Chinese cure calls for black or oolong tea to reduce swelling(2).

THEORY: Sensitivity to Tannins

Tannin is what gives a red wine pigment, bitterness and that mouth-drying reaction. It also is what makes red wines last a long time. Many red wine headache sufferers point to tannin as the problem because white wines contain much less. The tannin comes from the skins, seeds and stems of a grape and also from wood. Many commercial wines also add tannins from commercial refined sources made from chestnut, Indian gooseberry, gambir leaf and the wood of a very dense dark-wooded Spanish tree called Quebracho(1). The problem with the tannin argument is that chocolate, tea and soy are also all very high in tannin, so it begs the question “If you do not react to tannin in tea, why would you react to tannin in wine?”