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champagne-bubbles

5 Facts That Will Change the Way You Drink Champagne

You don’t have to be a wine connoisseur to know that champagne is delicious. But it would be nice to know a few facts in order to buy the right type, store it smartly, and get the most out of each bottle.

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1. The Serving Glass Matters. “If you are drinking champagne (and in some cases, other high-quality sparkling wine) in a flute, you might be missing out!” Belinda warns. “The complex aromas, texture, flavors and finish of a long-cellared wine are best enjoyed in a proper wineglass. You are, in essence, drinking a fine chardonnay—give the wine some space and increase your drinking pleasure.”

2. Champagne Pairs Well With Everything. Wondering which wine will pair well with every course, appetizer through dessert? “Champagne and other sparkling wines work with the entire tasting menu,” says Belinda. Her pick? “A richer pinot-noir-based style like Yellow Label from Veuve Clicquot can act just like a glass of pinot with your grilled salmon, roast chicken, smothered pork chops, or lacquered duck.”

3. Champagnes Don’t Need to Be Aged Like Wine. Saving that bottle of nice champagne you received as a gift for a “special” occasion? No need: “Most sparkling wines are designed to be consumed on release—from the wine store to your fridge and then into your glass. Though champagnes can certainly change, evolve, and improve with time, the champagne houses have already done the work for you: By law, a non-vintage (blend of grapes and wines from several different harvest years) has to be aged for a minimum of 15 months (for a vintage champagne, three years).

4. If You Must Store Champagne, Do It Like This. “Keep the bottles horizontally to keep the corks moist—dry corks lead to shrinkage and other bad things. Store in a cool (55 degrees is ideal, and cooler is fine), dark (wine and champagnes are subject to “light poisoning”), humid place. Your refrigerator is not ideal for long-term storage as some of the older models can vibrate which can affect what is inside the bottle.” Where does Belinda store hers? The closet!

5. What to Do If You Can’t Finish a Bottle. “If you are a single girl like myself, stock half bottles—so many champagne and sparkling wine producers make them! I like to keep a six-pack of 375-milliliter champagne in my fridge. If you’re opening a full-size bottle, invest in a metal stopper (many cost just a few dollars). Popping one of these will save the contents for a few days. Worst-case scenario: Use the remaining champagne for a delicious white wine sauce.”

Extreme close-up of explosion of champagne bottle cork

10 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Champagne

Extreme close-up of explosion of champagne bottle corkDazzle your New Years Eve guests with your knowledge about the golden wine from France. Tim Elliott from Honest Cooking with a list of 10 things you might not already know about Champagne.

With a new year fast approaching we have compiled some Champagne trivia to share while toasting your friends and family this weekend.

10) In the movie adaptations James Bond drinks Champagne more than any other beverage (nearly 40 glasses and counting).

9) The classic Champagne coupe was adapted from a wax mold made from the breast of Marie Antoinette.

8) There is about 90 pounds per square inch of pressure in a bottle of Champagne. That’s more than triple the pressure in an automobile tire.

7) A Champagne cork reaches a velocity of about 40 miles per hour (64 kilometers per hour) if popped out of the bottle. We recommend carefully twisting the cork out with a towel covering the bottle so no wine escapes and you don’t hurt a bystander.

6) Actress Marilyn Monroe took a bath in 350 bottles of Champagne. We are sure it was not at the proper temperature for drinking, however.

5) The longest recorded flight of a Champagne cork is over 177 feet (54 meters).

4) Don’t drink Champagne quickly or the bubbles will cause the alcohol to enter your bloodstream too fast often causing a headache. Savor your Champagne in small sips to taste the wine but also dissipate the bubbles before swallowing.

3) A Champagne riddler can turn as many as 50,000 bottles in a single day.

2) The largest bottle size for Champagne is called a Melchizedek and is equal to 40 standard bottles or 30 liters.

1) There are approximately 49 million bubbles in a standard sized bottle of Champagne.

Great sparkling wine is made all over the world but the most famous, and still unrivaled for quality, is made in France. We wish you a happy and prosperous New Year no matter what you choose to celebrate with.

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A Melchizedek of champers: 9 word facts about champagne

Glasses1It’s always difficult to say “Hello!” to January and “Good-bye…” to the holidays. Suddenly we find ourselves bogged down by the usual January blues—not to mention subjected to Blue Monday’s annual arrival — and burdened by certain debts after all that sweet and savory celebrating. Cookies, cakes, candy…butter cast haphazardly into every bubbling pot or whirring food mixer…and all capped off with a good dose of champagne come New Year’s Eve!

If it is going to be a while before you pop the next champagne cork, and you want to stave off those January blues, here’s a list of 9 interesting (and 0-calorie) champagne-related word facts to help you last until your next fix of bubbles.

1. The word champagne is derived from Latin campania, first used to describe the level open countryside around Rome. It now refers to a province in northeast France where the champagne grapes are grown, as well as to the wine itself. Latin campania is a derivative of campus, originally meaning simply a field; now in English, ‘campus’ denotes the grounds of a college or university.

2. Bubbly, a common nickname for champagne, is short for the now rarebubbly water. However, the wine was not always bubbly; up through the 19th century champagne was known largely as a pink, still wine. Any bubbliness posed difficulties: the wine would stop fermenting during the cold winters and then re-ferment in the spring, resulting in a release of carbon dioxide that tended to break the bottles. Eventually, the development of stronger bottles meant that drinkers could enjoy the sparkle that would become a defining characteristic of champagne.

3. The word bubble comes from the noun burble (also meaning a bubble), which comes from the now-obsolete verb burble, meaning to form bubbles; it’s probably onomatopoeic, a theory which makes sense if you imagine the sound of bubbles forming and popping , for example, in boiling water.

4. Speaking of onomatopoeias, another word for champagne (as well as any sparkling drink) is fizz; the noun comes from the verb fizz, a word which is purely imitative of the sound it represents.

5. An informal British name for champagne is champers. We see this same, typically British formulation of first-syllable plus -ers suffix in words likepreggers (pregnant).

6. You can also call champagne by the abbreviation sham. Compare alsoshampoo, an arbitrary alteration of the word.

7. If you’ve heard of champagne—or have 50 Cent or Jay-Z in your MP3 player—you’ve probably heard of Dom Pérignon, the prestigious brand of champagne often enjoyed by the rich and the famous. It’s named for Dom Pérignon, a Benedictine monk of the 17th century who contributed largely to the improvement of (still) Champagne wines during his lifetime. “Dom” was not his first name, by the way; instead, it’s a title (short for the Latin Dominus, ‘master’) given to certain distinguished Benedictine and Carthusian monks.

8. If you really want to impress your friends, tell them pre-toast that the champagne you’re about to enjoy is brut or demi-sec: two French words designating the taste of the wine. Brut champagne is unsweetened; the wordbrut means ‘rough’ or ‘raw’. (It’s related to the English brute, or ‘a savagely violent person or animal’, and comes from the Latin brutus meaning ‘dull, stupid’—just ask Julius Caesar.) Demi-sec, on the other hand, indicates a medium dry (or moderately sweetened) wine. We see a relative of this word in the German sparkling wine Sekt.

9. Have you ever seen one of those enormous bottles of champagne in a store window (and felt a hangover coming on just from looking at one of them)—40 times the size of a standard wine bottle? One of these enormous bottles is called a Melchizedek, named for the king and priest of the Book of Genesis who blesses Abram; his name literally means ‘my king is righteous’. Indeed, there are many different sized bottles of wine—from 0.1875 liters to 40—and, curiously, most are named for Biblical figures like Melchizedek. (Half a Melchizedek is a Nebuchadnezzar, for instance, and a fifth of a Melchizedek is known as a Methuselah.)

However, if it seems a bit too indulgent to pop another cork this year—or if (heaven forbid) you “get no kick from champagne” at all—it’s important to remember what can truly banish the January gloom: friends. (Especially friends who are happy to be regaled with tales of Benedictine monks and unexpected cognates at the next champagne-drinking opportunity!)

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Champagne facts about bubbles

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There are approximately 49 million bubbles in a standard sized bottle of Champagne.

Large bubbles are considered extremely unsightly and are not the mark of good quality Champagne. The tinier the bubble the better.

Champagne has three times the gas content of beer! It emits 30 bubbles per second!

For the best bubbles in your bubbly, hold the glass at an angle while you fill it.

For every carbon dioxide molecule that turns into a bubble in a glass of champagne, 4 others escape into the air.

A standard champagne bottle contains about 6 times its volume in dissolved carbon dioxide gas, which is responsible for the liquid’s fizz.

If you open a bottle of champagne & there’s a loud pop then you’ve actually lost bubbles.

Each champagne bubble carries tens of aromatic compounds — compounds that appear in heavier concentrations in bubbles than in the liquid champagne itself.

Opening Champagne – if you can remove the wire in 5 & a half twists, you are about to open a top quality bottle.

Moet is the number one selling brand of champagne in the world.

The world’s largest champagne glass, stands nearly 7 ft tall and holds the equivalent of 22 regular bottles. Now that’s a big glass of bubbly!

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How to Serve Champagne

ServingWhen it comes to toasting a special event or occasion, everyone usually heads for the champagne. Sure, you can toast with wine, beer, cocktails or soda, but using the bubbly denotes that it’s special. Most people call any kind of sparkling wine champagne, but true champagne comes from the region in France known for producing the best sparkling wines on Earth. The region, not surprisingly, is named Champagne. The climate, soil and strict production regulations in Champagne ensure that the quality of sparkling wine there is unmatched. Because of the delicate nature of champagne and the occasions where it’s typically served, it requires a little more than plastic cups or beer mugs to do it right.

The Chill
Serving champagne at the proper temperature is essential. There are some different schools of thought and preferences, but generally speaking, champagne should be served at a temperature between 39 and 48 degrees Fahrenheit (4 to 9 degrees Celsius). Non-vintage and sweeter champagnes can take the lower side of that scale, but a fine champagne should hover between 43 and 46 degrees Fahrenheit (6 to 7 degrees Celsius). A wine refrigerator is the best way to get an exact temperature, but a couple of hours in a regular refrigerator should get you close to where you need to be. You can also fill a wine bucket with half ice and half water for a 30-minute rapid chill. Remember to always leave the bottle corked until it’s time to serve.

The Flute
A beer mug or plastic cup might be an easier way to serve a drink to a roomful of people, but it isn’t the preference when serving champagne. If you want to do it right, you’ll want to splurge a little and use the tall, skinny and easily breakable flutes. The stem is long and they can be a bit precarious, but if it’s just for a toast, you don’t need to worry about your guests managing the delicate flute all night. If you don’t have long-stemmed flutes, you can get away with a tulip-shaped wine glass. The reason champagne is served in a flute is because the design of the glass strengthens the aromas of the wine and aids the flow of bubbles, a key aspect of drinking sparkling wines. And while the bubbly is served chilled, champagne flutes should always remain at room temperature.

The Pour
After you’ve uncorked your champagne, which is best to do aimed away from people and glass, it’s time for the pour. Champagne is extremely bubbly, and the last thing you want to do is pour it so that it flows over the glass and onto your guest. Start with just a little in the bottom and let the bubbles die down. Then fill the glass about two-thirds full with a steady, even pour.

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Champagne Corks travel at 25 mph

Champagne corks pop out of the bottle at the speed of 25 miles per hour. A team of German scientists discovered this after shaking a bottle of downloadchampagne. According to their calculations, it’s theoretically possible that corks fly at 62 miles per hour.
This speed is not surprising considering the pressure in the champagne bottle is twice as high as in a tyre, namely six bar.
So be careful when you open a bottle. Always keep your thumb on the cork when you remove the muselet (wire basket).
Only when a bottle has been cooled in the fridge and hasn’t been shaken is there hardly any pressure and you don’t have to worry about the speed of the cork. .